Stories of Australian Science 2015

CaptureThe printed jet engine, pain relief from tarantula venom, teaching stem cells to forget, searching for dark matter in a gold mine, better bread, and a new Pony Express. These are some of the highlights of the past year featured in Stories of Australian Science 2015.

And we have a special feature on Australia–Japan collaboration: how researchers are collaborating on malaria, neutron beams and much more.

Around the world lives are being transformed by Australian ideas: the bionic ear; the cervical cancer vaccine Gardasil; chewing gum that repairs teeth; the astronomical ideas that have made wi-fi fast and reliable; and dozens of mining technologies.

Please feel free to use the stories for your own social media, website, or publications. Everything is available for reuse under a Creative Commons licence.

Browse the collection

You can browse this year’s collection at stories.scienceinpublic.com.au/2015

Or use the menus on the left to search all our stories by field or science, organisation or State.

The full publication is also available as a PDF and in print. If you’d like us to send you some copies please email niall@scienceinpublic.com.au

Contents

Science deep underground to high in the sky:

Xinhua Wu led the project to print a jet engine. Credit: Monash University
Xinhua Wu led the project to print a jet engine. Credit: Monash University

Healthy development, and staying that way:

Quantum quandaries:

Looking for answers in new places:

Narrowing the scope:

Coral trout biomass in the protected zones has more than doubled since the 1980. Credit: LTMP, Australian Institute of Marine Science
Coral trout biomass in the protected zones has more than doubled since the 1980. Credit: LTMP, Australian Institute of Marine Science

Protection pays off:

Genetics:

Our Prime Minister recognises the best of the best:

Brian Schiller says “students can play and create, and relate their learning to the world around them”. Credit: Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science/WildBear
Brian Schiller says “students can play and create, and relate their learning to the world around them”. Credit: Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science/WildBear

Stem cells shaking up science:

Golden and silver staph are recognised as distinct species thanks to Menzies School of Health Research scientists. Credit: Phil Giffard
Golden and silver staph are recognised as distinct species thanks to Menzies School of Health Research scientists. Credit: Phil Giffard

Accurate diagnosis and delivery:

Research excellence:

The printed parts will hold up to repeated handling and close study. Credit: Centre for Human Anatomy Education
The printed parts will hold up to repeated handling and close study. Credit: Centre for Human Anatomy Education

Improving study scope:

Questioning the Universe:

Japan–Australia collaborations:

Elephant seal solves an ocean mystery. Credit: Chris Oosthuizen
Elephant seal solves an ocean mystery. Credit: Chris Oosthuizen

Eureka Prizes:

L’Oréal Australia Fellows:

Photo: Cara Doherty. Credit: L’Oréal Australia
Photo: Cara Doherty.
Credit: L’Oréal Australia

Academy recognition, Clunies Ross medals, and state awards:

The wound-healing worm munching through the liver. Credit: Banchob Sripa
The wound-healing worm munching through the liver. Credit: Banchob Sripa

Fresh Scientists:

 Credits

Concept/editor in chief: Niall Byrne
Editor/project coordination: Lydia Hales
Writing and editing: Ellie Michaelides, Errol Hunt, Toni Stevens, Megan Girdler, Jane Lyons, Margie Beilharz, Tim Thwaites, Sarah Keenihan, Lydia Hales, Niall Byrne
Design: www.saltcreative.com.au
Print: immij